Some Don't Quite Agree

Paul A. Keating PKEATING at JCVAXA.JCU.EDU
Thu Jun 1 21:59:07 MDT 1995


        I think this may have been meant for the list, but it
        came direct to me.  I have no qualms with being taken
        to task, so I see no need to hide it.  My response
        follows.
 
=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
From:   IN%"space at AZStarNet.com"  1-JUN-1995 18:48:12.76
To:     IN%"PKEATING at jcvaxa.jcu.edu"
CC:
Subj:   RE: A Democracy?
 
Return-path: <space at azstarnet.com>
Received: from web.azstarnet.com (azstarnet.com)
 by jcvaxa.jcu.edu (PMDF V4.3-7 #9465) id <01HR7A63E8ZK8Y5LB6 at jcvaxa.jcu.edu>;
 Thu, 1 Jun 1995 18:48:04 EST
Received: from slip135.indirect.com (slip135.indirect.com [165.247.1.135])
 by web.azstarnet.com (8.6.10/8.6.10) with SMTP id PAA02114 for
 <PKEATING at JCVAXA.JCU.EDU>; Thu, 1 Jun 1995 15:48:17 -0700
Date: Thu, 01 Jun 1995 16:01:05 -0700
From: space at AZStarNet.com (Steve Moyer)
Subject: Re: A Democracy?
X-Sender: space at azstarnet.com
To: PKEATING at jcvaxa.jcu.edu
Message-id: <199506012248.PAA02114 at web.azstarnet.com>
MIME-version: 1.0
X-Mailer: <PC Eudora Version 1.4>
Content-type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT
 
Do you think I don't know this?  Words have meanings not just by the
way the dictionary defines them, but by the way people use them.
 
Ask 100 people if we live in a democracy and 90 percent of them will
say "Yes."
 
Steve
 
At 10:33 PM 5/30/95 -0500, Paul A. Keating wrote:
>        From time to time there appears a need for a simple
>        reminder of what should have been learned in high
>        school civics:
>
>        The United States of America is not a Democracy.
>
>        The United States of America is a Democratic Republic.
>                                                     ^^^^^^^^
>        Yes.  The USA was founded on principles of a republic,
>        and not the principles of a democracy.  There is quite
>        a difference between a democracy and a republic.  There
>        is even a difference between a "run of the mill" republic
>        and a democratic republic.
>
>        For any cynics who doubt the above:  Please don't further
>        reveal just how much you forgot from that high school
>        civics class by asking how this can be or by asking just
>        what the differences are.  Do us all a favor:  visit your
>        local library, find and sit down with a book about
>        government, and read.
>
>
Teserai Communications Project:
Web Design - Internet/WWW consulting and training.
The RedDog Journal - Electronic journal of the arts
http://www.indirect.com/www/informa
Stephen Micheal Barnes
742 East Montebello #9 Phoenix, AZ 85014 informa at indirect.com
=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
 
 
        My response, first sent private, but not needing to
        be cloaked, either:
 
 
<><><><><><><><>
|Date: Thu, 01 Jun 1995 16:01:05 -0700
|From: space at AZStarNet.com (Steve Moyer)
|Subject: Re: A Democracy?
|
|Do you think I don't know this?
 
        I don't know if you know this.  Do you know this?
 
|                                  Words have meanings not just by the
|way the dictionary defines them, but by the way people use them.
 
        A civics (government) textbook was suggested as a source
        reference for refresher training, not a dictionary.
 
        If I call an apple "an orange," does the word "orange" used by
        the people (me) define the fruit heretofore known as an apple?
 
        Words having meaning "by the way people use them" is pure bunk,
        and a puerile attempt at rationalizing the lax attitude toward
        correct word usage that is sadly becoming more prevalent in the
        USA.  The language is being bastardized by those who use words
        that they don't know the meaning of AND continue to misuse the
        words vice seeking the definitions and correcting their misuse.
 
|Ask 100 people if we live in a democracy and 90 percent of them will
|say "Yes."
 
        If 90 percent of those 100 people say we live in a democracy,
        that 90 percent is WRONG.  We may enjoy more democracy than
        people in many other countries, and our republic may allow
        more democracy to exist within our borders than other forms
        of government allow where they exist, but the truth remains:
 
                        We live in a republic.
 
        If in the middle ages 100 people were asked whether the world
        was flat, 99.9999 percent of them would have said, "Yes."
 
        Still, as those 0.0001 percent pointed out, the world was not
        flat.  Being wrong is being wrong, regardless of the number
        who are wrong.
 
        Majority rule does not change the zebra's stripes.
 
        BTW, to keep things in perspective, my posting was sent to and
        distributed by the RUSHTALK list.  I hope you didn't think that
        I singled you out for my statement just because the listserver
        addressed the posting directly to you, and identified it as being
        from me.  Your response came direct and not via the listserver,
        so I do not know whether you took umbrage (on a personal level)
        with my posting.
 
        PS:  Most libraries are open on weekends, too.
 
|At 10:33 PM 5/30/95 -0500, Paul A. Keating wrote:
|>        From time to time there appears a need for a simple
|>        reminder of what should have been learned in high
|>        school civics:
|>
        [ Etc., etc., deleted]
 
<><><><><><><><>



More information about the Rushtalk mailing list