Some Don't Quite Agree

Steve Moyer space at AZSTARNET.COM
Thu Jun 1 21:24:47 MDT 1995


Paul,   YOu might consider that a PRIVATE message is not supposed to
be distributed on a LISTSERV.  Has anyone ever told you that you are
a "jerk?"
 
I'm signing off this list.  Please DON'T mail me again.
 
Steve
 
 
 
At 10:59 PM 6/1/95 -0500, Paul A. Keating wrote:
>        I think this may have been meant for the list, but it
>        came direct to me.  I have no qualms with being taken
>        to task, so I see no need to hide it.  My response
>        follows.
>
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>From:   IN%"space at AZStarNet.com"  1-JUN-1995 18:48:12.76
>To:     IN%"PKEATING at jcvaxa.jcu.edu"
>CC:
>Subj:   RE: A Democracy?
>
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>Date: Thu, 01 Jun 1995 16:01:05 -0700
>From: space at AZStarNet.com (Steve Moyer)
>Subject: Re: A Democracy?
>X-Sender: space at azstarnet.com
>To: PKEATING at jcvaxa.jcu.edu
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>Do you think I don't know this?  Words have meanings not just by the
>way the dictionary defines them, but by the way people use them.
>
>Ask 100 people if we live in a democracy and 90 percent of them will
>say "Yes."
>
>Steve
>
>At 10:33 PM 5/30/95 -0500, Paul A. Keating wrote:
>>        From time to time there appears a need for a simple
>>        reminder of what should have been learned in high
>>        school civics:
>>
>>        The United States of America is not a Democracy.
>>
>>        The United States of America is a Democratic Republic.
>>                                                     ^^^^^^^^
>>        Yes.  The USA was founded on principles of a republic,
>>        and not the principles of a democracy.  There is quite
>>        a difference between a democracy and a republic.  There
>>        is even a difference between a "run of the mill" republic
>>        and a democratic republic.
>>
>>        For any cynics who doubt the above:  Please don't further
>>        reveal just how much you forgot from that high school
>>        civics class by asking how this can be or by asking just
>>        what the differences are.  Do us all a favor:  visit your
>>        local library, find and sit down with a book about
>>        government, and read.
>>
>>
>Teserai Communications Project:
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>
>
>        My response, first sent private, but not needing to
>        be cloaked, either:
>
>
><><><><><><><><>
>|Date: Thu, 01 Jun 1995 16:01:05 -0700
>|From: space at AZStarNet.com (Steve Moyer)
>|Subject: Re: A Democracy?
>|
>|Do you think I don't know this?
>
>        I don't know if you know this.  Do you know this?
>
>|                                  Words have meanings not just by the
>|way the dictionary defines them, but by the way people use them.
>
>        A civics (government) textbook was suggested as a source
>        reference for refresher training, not a dictionary.
>
>        If I call an apple "an orange," does the word "orange" used by
>        the people (me) define the fruit heretofore known as an apple?
>
>        Words having meaning "by the way people use them" is pure bunk,
>        and a puerile attempt at rationalizing the lax attitude toward
>        correct word usage that is sadly becoming more prevalent in the
>        USA.  The language is being bastardized by those who use words
>        that they don't know the meaning of AND continue to misuse the
>        words vice seeking the definitions and correcting their misuse.
>
>|Ask 100 people if we live in a democracy and 90 percent of them will
>|say "Yes."
>
>        If 90 percent of those 100 people say we live in a democracy,
>        that 90 percent is WRONG.  We may enjoy more democracy than
>        people in many other countries, and our republic may allow
>        more democracy to exist within our borders than other forms
>        of government allow where they exist, but the truth remains:
>
>                        We live in a republic.
>
>        If in the middle ages 100 people were asked whether the world
>        was flat, 99.9999 percent of them would have said, "Yes."
>
>        Still, as those 0.0001 percent pointed out, the world was not
>        flat.  Being wrong is being wrong, regardless of the number
>        who are wrong.
>
>        Majority rule does not change the zebra's stripes.
>
>        BTW, to keep things in perspective, my posting was sent to and
>        distributed by the RUSHTALK list.  I hope you didn't think that
>        I singled you out for my statement just because the listserver
>        addressed the posting directly to you, and identified it as being
>        from me.  Your response came direct and not via the listserver,
>        so I do not know whether you took umbrage (on a personal level)
>        with my posting.
>
>        PS:  Most libraries are open on weekends, too.
>
>|At 10:33 PM 5/30/95 -0500, Paul A. Keating wrote:
>|>        From time to time there appears a need for a simple
>|>        reminder of what should have been learned in high
>|>        school civics:
>|>
>        [ Etc., etc., deleted]
>
><><><><><><><><>
>
>



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