The Debate

William B. White WHITEWB at JCCW22.CC.SUNYJCC.EDU
Mon Oct 7 08:08:39 MDT 1996


From:   NAME: Bill White
        FUNC: HUMANITIES
        TEL: 326/371                          <WHITE, BILL AT A1 AT JCCV03>
To:     IN%"rushtalk at athena.csdco.com"@MRGATE at JCCW22


Dittos to Sam, Tony, Jim, and John for their analysis of the debate.

I thought Dole came across as the more substantial and "authentic" person.  His
humor was pointed, his manner respectful.  Dole showed himself as the man of
experience; the noble warrior of the Great War; the gallant, honorable
statesman of the Senate, plainspoken patriot, resilient and reliable.  Dole
understands sacrifice and the triumph over pain and suffering.  He made it
clear that compassion is a habit of his heart not a showy program that targets
spending toward population segments that will translate into blocks of voters
who are expected to return the favor.  He stands for the integrity of promises
and his word.  His word is trustworthy. He represents the best of American
political energy.


Clinton is an actor who verges on the classic portrayal of the clown:  His face
paints the emotions of happy/sad; pleasure/pain quite well, but one is reminded
it's only an act to accompany his rhetoric, which is carefully crafted to
garner votes.  Clinton is youthful (too youthful for presidential levels of
leadership); even after four years supposedly doing the serious business
leading the greatest nation, he still looks like an adolescent in search of
experience.  He has the skills of the sophist, but no real depth of field.  He
is fundamentally a charming, but dangerous demogogue with a good hairdresser.
He represents what is transitory and superficial in the American experience.

I think voters have a genuine choice here.  The debates so far have helped to
make that clear.

Bill White



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