Royalty

Richard Swerdlin swerdlin at GTE.NET
Mon Sep 8 16:57:03 MDT 1997


> From: John Bush
> Date: Monday, September 08, 1997 12:07
>
> On  Fri, 5 Sep 1997, Richard Swerdlin wrote:
>
>
> >         "Sour grapes" is a common defense mechanism concerning
unhappiness
> > with election results or more private events.  Having voted
> > for both winning and losing candidates over the years, democratic
> > elections yield reasonable results generally.Richard Swerdlin
> > (swerdlin at gte.net)
>
> Well, I guess I tend to disagree.  I voted for a losing candidate
> last year, but I've also voted for winning candidates.  But that
> doesn't mean I think the winning candidates were much better than
> we'd get from a crap shoot.  This century, I can only think of two,
> maybe three President's that I think were worth anything.  And the
> last was Reagan.
===============================================
REPLY
===============================================
JB:

        Differences are likely to be wide on this point, if for no other
reason than peceptions of the role of presidents in the scheme of
things.  I have never shared the awe of various neighbors, or even that
of teachers, concerning presidents.  Being genetically skeptical,
essentially I saw presidents as other humans, with of course more
influence than most.  That view remains, even after the passing of
many years and many presidents.

        In line with the above, I recall hearing a long time ago a
philosphical statement to the effect that presidents come and go, but
Congress continues.  In essence, while presidents can make any
number of proposals, these have to win legislative approval.  With
the US reflecting so many varied viewpoints or interests, obtaining
approval is often easier said than done.

         Overall, I have not participated in opinion surveys trying to
establish the top ten presidents (or something comparable).  From
time to time there is commentary concerning this point on one news   show
or another.  This type of survey may be unrealistic, if for no
other reason than the proverbial one of good times having many
sires, while bad times are usually orphans.

Richard Swerdlin
(swerdlin at gte.net)



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