I have to get out of this sick town - don't let your kids read this

William White wbbanjo at YAHOO.COM
Tue Mar 28 06:53:50 MST 2006


Not only obsolete business go out of business.  So, too, do businesses that are out of sync with the marketplace.  Chasing every rabbit does not necessarily result in a successful hunt.
   
  Oil is plentiful and cheap but still profitable to extract and convert to many useful products.  Until a cheaper resource finds its way to the our marketplace, it will continue be sought after and used in great quantities to fuel the "engines" of societies that have access to it or can afford it.  
   
  Countries without such access have to make do.  Denmark uses a lot of windmills for power, but  they are loud and ugly.  People seem to put up with all sorts of annoyances to participate in "modern culture."  Meanwhile, the sensible Danes admire American lifestyle, mobility and freedom.
   
  Bill 
   
  
Jim <jnantz2 at 216-19-216-108.GETNET.NET> wrote:
  Stephen A. Frye wrote:
> Nonsense. Fuel cells are *a* source, and yes, they are years away. 
> That is not a reason to not work them. There are many other energy 
> sources. Are they practical? Not yet. Should we really work them? I 
> think so.

I agree that work should continue to make fuel cells more affordable. 
Such research is being done by big corporations who believe they'll make 
a helluva lot of money from selling fuel cells.

> How much effort do you really believe any corporation o industry will 
> put into a product that might rob them of business?

If they have any sense they'll adapt their business to make a profit 
from the new product. American history is full of companies that went 
out of business because they did not adapt. Likewise our history is 
full of companies that did adapt and are still around today. One 
example is the breweries when prohibition came along. They stopped 
making beer and started making other stuff. When the laws again 
changed, they were ready to get back into the beer business.

IBM is a company that got started in the late 19th century making 
typewriters and a machine the US government used to process the forms 
for the 1890 census. IBM no longer makes that census card counting 
machine. The last I heard, they no longer make typewriters. Now the do 
computers. They adapted. The argument could have been made at one 
point that computers would make the census counting machine and 
typewriters obsolete.


-- 

Sgt Schultz "You're a better cook than my wife."
Louis LeBeau "Merci"
Sgt Scultz "You're also better looking."


		
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