Major question

Tom Matiska tom.matiska at ATT.NET
Fri Oct 15 15:39:29 MDT 2010


Problem with the big blocks was that Mr Yunick and Mr Petty could build better engines than Mr Goodyear could build tires.   Petty's Hemi was turning 175+mph laps in 1964, three years before Goodyear's bias belted polyglass tires made that less dangerous.   By 1971 Petty's Superbird was cutting the air at 220+.  the horsepower wars just weren't sustainable. .... thus the restrictions on cubes and aerodynamics. 
 
Tom
 
 
 


--- On Fri, 10/15/10, John <blueoval57 at VERIZON.NET> wrote:


From: John <blueoval57 at VERIZON.NET>
Subject: Re: [RUSHTALK] Major question
To: RUSHTALK at CSDCO.COM
Date: Friday, October 15, 2010, 4:43 PM






On Fri Oct 15 03:35:16 CDT 2010, Dennis Putnam wrote: 

> I disagree vehemently. First stock car racing started long before NASCAR. 

I take it that you mean before NASCAR became a registered, trademarked corporation, Dennis? Because, it's an acronym for "National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing." In its earliest organized form, it happened on the beaches of Florida in cars that you could buy right off the dealer's showroom floor. The sport accelerated in popularity during the 1960s, leading to the famed "horsepower wars" among American automobile manufacturers, Ford, Buick, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Dodge, Chrysler, and Plymouth. Driver-turned-mechanical engineer, Smoky Yunick caused the rules to be changed not to permit displacement above the current 358 cubic inch when he began tweaking Chevy's 427 cid big block in 1968. 

John Q. 

There was no money in it, just bragging rights. Moonshine runners had money and an incentive to produce fast cars. Without that combination, there would be no stock car racing. It was after the creation of such technology that the penchant of men to race each other developed. You have the cart in front of the horse. Without prohibition 
> (taxation started after repeal of the 18th amendment) stock car racing 
> would not have developed for years, if ever because there was no 
> incentive to build them. 
> 
> On 10/14/2010 6:38 PM, Tom Matiska wrote: 
>> 
>> No. The history of stock car racing might be a little less 
>> colorful, but the itch to race preceded Mr Fords cars and it would 
>> have evolved anyway. Also, the 'moonshine running" that influenced 
>> early stock car racing was more about post-prohibition tax evasion. 
>> If I was going to make the point I'd claim liquor taxes(not 
>> prohibition) were a greater influence. 
>> 
>> Tom 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --- On *Thu, 10/14/10, Steven Laib / /* wrote: 
>> 
>> 
>> From: Steven Laib 
>> Subject: [RUSHTALK] Major question 
>> To: RUSHTALK at CSDCO.COM 
>> Date: Thursday, October 14, 2010, 6:18 PM 
>> 
>> One of our local talkers said this evening that if it wasn't for 
>> prohibition during the 1920's we wouldn't have NASCAR. 
>> OK, it isn't an earthshaking question, but does anyone agree? 
>> 
>> SDL 
>> 
> 
> 
> 
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