Major question

Dennis Putnam dap1 at BELLSOUTH.NET
Fri Oct 15 17:05:13 MDT 2010


 I mean before NASCAR existed at all. Stock car racing began as an
unsanctioned and illegal street competition among moonshine runners who
modified their cars to outrun police. The police were no match so they
started racing each other for pride. It was 1936, 3 years after
prohibition, that these street cars began racing on the beach as a
sanctioned and legal race and 1959 when the first Daytona 500 was run at
Daytona Speedway. That was also the last time true stock cars raced as
they evolved into something on which now the only thing that is stock is
the marque. However, the moonshine runners still ran them on the streets
to deliver the goods due to tax issues but the demand quickly died. As
someone said earlier Junior Johnson was such a driver as was his dad
before him.

Also, someone mentioned Keg Tennedy's dad but he did not run moonshine.
That was mostly limited to the south and to a lesser extent in the west.
Kennedy smuggled high quality, commercially available liquor via bribery
and brute force against police and Feds. Due to its proximity to Canada
where it was legal to make, the northern section in particular, did not
have to drink moonshine. Which by the way, still is made today,
illegally, down here. I know first hand why there is little demand for
it today with commercial distillates. "Eew! That is not for the young."
(As an aside, who know the origins of that quip?)

As for the growth of NASCAR, you are correct. When a GM engineer named
Delorian formed a back door design team they came up with the GTO which
was a big hit and started the muscle car era of the 60's and with it the
growth of NASCAR. I consider myself very fortunate to have been a
teenager in the 60's (I still have my first new car, a '69 Plymouth
Roadrunner convertible, 383, waiting to be restored as a retirement
project). In spite of its success GM didn't like that type car
associated with the Pontiac marque. Eventually they eliminated it and a
rift bloomed between GM and Delorian. Eventually he left GM and the rest
is history ... or the future. Doc Brown would never have built the time
machine and the flux capacitor would have been added to the junk heap of
useless technology.

On 10/15/2010 4:43 PM, John wrote:
>
> On Fri Oct 15 03:35:16 CDT 2010, Dennis Putnam wrote:
>
> > I disagree vehemently. First stock car racing started long before
> NASCAR.
>
> I take it that you mean before NASCAR became a registered, trademarked
> corporation, Dennis? Because, it's an acronym for "National
> Association of Stock Car Auto Racing." In its earliest organized form,
> it happened on the beaches of Florida in cars that you could buy right
> off the dealer's showroom floor. The sport accelerated in popularity
> during the 1960s, leading to the famed "horsepower wars" among
> American automobile manufacturers, Ford, Buick, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile,
> Dodge, Chrysler, and Plymouth. Driver-turned-mechanical engineer,
> Smoky Yunick caused the rules to be changed not to permit displacement
> above the current 358 cubic inch when he began tweaking Chevy's 427
> cid big block in 1968.
>
> John Q.
>
> There was no money in it, just bragging rights. Moonshine runners had
> money and an incentive to produce fast cars. Without that combination,
> there would be no stock car racing. It was after the creation of such
> technology that the penchant of men to race each other developed. You
> have the cart in front of the horse. Without prohibition
>
> > (taxation started after repeal of the 18th amendment) stock car racing
>
> > would not have developed for years, if ever because there was no
>
> > incentive to build them.
>
> >
>
> > On 10/14/2010 6:38 PM, Tom Matiska wrote:
>
> >>
>
> >> No. The history of stock car racing might be a little less
>
> >> colorful, but the itch to race preceded Mr Fords cars and it would
>
> >> have evolved anyway. Also, the 'moonshine running" that influenced
>
> >> early stock car racing was more about post-prohibition tax evasion.
>
> >> If I was going to make the point I'd claim liquor taxes(not
>
> >> prohibition) were a greater influence.
>
> >>
>
> >> Tom
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >> --- On *Thu, 10/14/10, Steven Laib //* wrote:
>
> >>
>
> >>
>
> >> From: Steven Laib
>
> >> Subject: [RUSHTALK] Major question
>
> >> To: RUSHTALK at CSDCO.COM
>
> >> Date: Thursday, October 14, 2010, 6:18 PM
>
> >>
>
> >> One of our local talkers said this evening that if it wasn't for
>
> >> prohibition during the 1920's we wouldn't have NASCAR.
>
> >> OK, it isn't an earthshaking question, but does anyone agree?
>
> >>
>
> >> SDL
>
> >>
>
> >
>
> >
>
> >
>


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