[Rushtalk] Do You Remember?

Tom Matiska tom.matiska at att.net
Sun Nov 16 10:12:00 MST 2014


I honestly don't remember 1 minute of any such excitement.  I clearly remember the civil defense sirens going off in June '72 and knowing it was serious.... it meant the levees broke and Hurricane Agnes just won....  Tom
T-Mobile. America's First Nationwide 4G Network

Richard Whitenight <rwhitenight2004 at gmail.com> wrote:

>[image: EMMERGENCY banner The Emergency Broadcast System Causes Panic in
>1971]
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/EMMERGENCY-banner.jpg>
>
>On Saturday, February 20th, 1971, at 9:33 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, the
>nation panicked. The Emergency Broadcast System—a governmental method of
>communication to be used in the event of war or catastrophe—was
>accidentally authenticated with the code word “hatefulness” by civilian
>Teletype operator Wayland S. Eberhardt. The message was received by radio
>stations across the country, and with no reason to assume that this wasn’t
>the real thing, they responded appropriately and relayed the bulletin to
>thousands of listeners.
>
>[image: EBS Broadcaster The Emergency Broadcast System Causes Panic in 1971]
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/EBS-Broadcaster.jpg>
>
>Imagine hearing the following
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/WOWO-Bob-Sievers-02-20-1971.mp3>
>on
>your radio in 1971…
>
>*“This station has interrupted its regular program at the request of the
>United States government to participate in the Emergency Broadcast System
>serving the Fort Wayne area….”*
>
>[image: Emergency Broadcast System 2 The Emergency Broadcast System Causes
>Panic in 1971]
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Emergency-Broadcast-System-2.jpg>
>
>Bob Sievers, whom you just heard, later called this moment his longest five
>minutes on radio. For all he knew, he was about to deliver a message to his
>listeners forecasting not the weather, but the apocalypse.
>
>[image: EBS 1 The Emergency Broadcast System Causes Panic in 1971]
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/EBS-1.jpg>
>
>Howard Viken, in Minneapolis, responded as well
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Howard-Viken-WCCO-AM_EBS_2-20-1971.mp3>,
>with the same prepared statement as the Sievers broadcast.
>
>At 9:59 a.m., the first cancellation message was sent, but it used the
>incorrect code word. At 10:13 a.m., 40 minutes after the emergency
>broadcast began, the correct cancellation code word, “impish,” was sent and
>received.
>
>[image: 1970 Broadcaster The Emergency Broadcast System Causes Panic in
>1971]
><http://doyouremember.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/1970-Broadcaster.jpg>
>
>Interestingly, this false alarm exposed many flaws in the EBS. Not only had
>many stations not received the alert, but also some had simply ignored it
>because it came at the same time as the regularly scheduled test. Other
>broadcasters weren’t fully aware of how to respond.
>
>Because of this false alarm, many problems with the system were fixed. In
>1997, the Emergency Alert System replaced the EBS.
>
>
>
>
>-- 
>Regards,
>Richard Whitenight
>Arlington, Texas
>
>Twitter:  @rwhitenight0648
>
>My e-mail is being maintained by the NSA, CIA, FBI, and the Department of
>Homeland Security.  You can't get better secure e-mail than that.
>
>_______________________________________________
>Rushtalk mailing list
>Rushtalk at csdco.com
>http://kalos.csdco.com/mailman/listinfo/rushtalk


More information about the Rushtalk mailing list