[Rushtalk] Murder by wetback not a rare event

Carl Spitzer cwsiv at juno.com
Sun Apr 2 17:47:01 MDT 2017







Shooting of Kathryn Steinle

>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
Jump to: navigation, search 
    Shooting of Kathryn Steinle
 Pier 14, SF 4.JPG Pier 14, site of
            the shooting
              Location
Pier 14, San Francisco, California
                Date
July 1, 2015 (2015-07-01)
6:30 p.m.
               Weapon
.40-caliber SIG Sauer P226 handgun
               Victim
Kathryn Steinle
       Suspected perpetrator
Francisco Sanchez (in custody)

On July 1, 2015, a man fired a stolen gun on Pier 14 in the Embarcadero
district in San Francisco, California. The bullet ricocheted off the
pavement, then struck 32-year-old Kathryn Steinle in the back, causing
her to die two hours later at a hospital. Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez,
an illegal immigrant from Mexico who had previously been deported five
times, was arrested and charged with her murder.

The shooting sparked controversy and political debate over San
Francisco's status as a sanctuary city. President Donald Trump cited
Lopez-Sanchez in support of his proposal to deport foreign nationals
living illegally in the United States, and mentioned Steinle during his
acceptance speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention.



Contents

 [hide]  

      * 1Shooting 
      * 2Victim 
      * 3Suspect 
      * 4Legal proceedings 
              * 4.1Investigation 
              * 4.2Lawsuit 
      * 5Reaction 
              * 5.1Local and state reaction 
              * 5.2Political reactions 
              * 5.3Kate's Law 
      * 6See also 
      * 7References

Shooting[edit]

At 6:30 p.m. on July 1, 2015, Francisco Sanchez allegedly fired three
shots from a .40-caliber handgun at Pier 14, a tourist attraction area
at the Embarcadero waterfront district. One of the bullets struck
Steinle in the back and pierced her aorta. She collapsed to the pavement
while screaming for help to her father Jim, who was accompanying her at
the pier.[1] Jim performed CPR on Kathryn before paramedics arrived and
took her to an ambulance. She died two hours later at San Francisco
General Hospital.[1]

Sanchez was arrested about an hour after the shooting at Pier 40, about
one mile south of Pier 14 and divers from a police boat found the gun in
the bay alongside Pier 14, the next day.[2][3][4] Following his arrest,
Sanchez was booked into San Francisco County Jail on suspicion of
murder.[5][6]

The gun used by Sánchez had been stolen in downtown San Francisco from a
Bureau of Land Management officer's personal vehicle on June 27, 2015,
according to the Bureau of Land Management.[2] The car's window had been
broken.[7][8]




Victim[edit]

Kathryn Michelle "Kate" Steinle (December 13, 1982 – July 1, 2015) was
originally from Pleasanton, California, and graduated from Amador Valley
High School and earned a communications degree from California
Polytechnic State University.[1][3] She was employed at Medtronic in San
Francisco and was living on Beale Street, close to Pier 14, the site of
the shooting.[9][3] Her funeral was held at a winery in Pleasanton,
California on July 9.[10]




Suspect[edit]

         Francisco Sanchez
                Born
José Inez García Zarate
Mexico
            Nationality
Mexican
             Occupation
Unemployed
          Criminal charge
Second-degree murder, enhancement of
using a firearm, being a felon in
possession of a firearm[11]
          Criminal status
In jail


           Capture status
Arrested on July 1, 2015

Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez (or Francisco Sanchez; given name José Inez
García Zarate),[12] of Guanajuato, Mexico, had been deported from the
U.S. a total of five times, most recently in 2009.[13] He was on
probation in Texas at the time of the shooting.[14] He had seven felony
convictions. When he was apprehended, Sanchez was listed as 45 years old
by police, but as 52 in jail records.[15]

Sanchez arrived to the U.S. sometime before 1991, the year he was
convicted of his first drug charge in Arizona. In 1993, he was convicted
three times in Washington state for felony heroin possession and
manufacturing narcotics. Following another drug conviction and jail
term, this time in Oregon, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization
Service (INS) deported Sanchez in June 1994. However, Sanchez returned
to the U.S. within two years and was convicted again of heroin
possession in Washington state. He was deported for the second time in
1997.[12]

On February 2, 1998, Sanchez was deported for the third time, after
reentering the U.S. through Arizona. United States Border Patrol caught
him six days later at a border crossing, and a federal court sentenced
Sanchez to five years and three months in federal prison for
unauthorized reentry. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE),
formerly INS, deported Sanchez in 2003 for his fourth deportation.
However, he reentered the U.S. through the Texas border and got another
federal prison sentence for reentry before being deported for the fifth
time in June 2009.[12]

Less than three months after his fifth deportation, Sanchez was caught
attempting to cross the border in Eagle Pass, Texas. He pleaded guilty
to felony reentry; upon sentencing, a federal court recommended Sanchez
be placed in "a federal medical facility as soon as possible".[12]

On March 26, 2015, at the request of the San Francisco Sheriff's
Department, United States Bureau of Prisons (BOP) had turned Sanchez
over to San Francisco authorities for an outstanding drug warrant.[16]
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) had issued a detainer for
Sanchez requesting that he be kept in custody until immigration
authorities could pick him up. As a sanctuary city, however, which
limits cooperation with ICE only to cases where active charges against
the immigrant are identified, San Francisco did not honor the detainer
and released him, since they found no active warrant for his arrest.[17]
San Francisco officials transported Sanchez to San Francisco County Jail
on March 26, 2015, to face a 20-year-old felony charge of selling and
possessing marijuana after Sanchez completed his latest prison term in
San Bernardino County for entering in the country without the proper
documents.[18] He was released from San Francisco County Jail on April
15, and had no outstanding warrants or judicial warrants, as confirmed
by the San Francisco Sheriff's Department.[14]




Legal proceedings[edit]

Sanchez was formally charged with first-degree murder and possession of
illegal narcotics on July 6. Sanchez admitted in a KGO-TV interview that
he committed the shooting but said he found the gun wrapped in a T-shirt
under a bench after taking sleep pills he found from a trash can. He
also claimed that he was aiming at sea lions and that Steinle's shooting
was accidental.[19][15] He pleaded not guilty to the charges, and was
held on $5 million bail.[20] Sanchez's attorney, Matt Gonzalez, stated
in court that the shooting was likely accidental.[21]

On July 28, prosecutors filed an additional charge against Sanchez:
being a felon in possession of a firearm.[22] On September 4, San
Francisco Superior Court Judge Brendan Conroy stated that there was
enough evidence to try Sanchez. Initially charged with first-degree
murder, Sanchez will be tried for second-degree murder. If found guilty
of the charges of second-degree murder, being a felon in possession of a
firearm, and an enhancement of using a firearm, Sanchez could face a
life imprisonment without the possibility of parole for 45 years. A jury
can also decide if he is guilty of manslaughter.[11][23]

In August, a judge set December 2 as the date to assign the case to a
judge for trial. Lopez-Sanchez's public defender said there have been no
discussions of a plea deal.[24] The trial is scheduled for February 17,
2017.[25]




Investigation[edit]

The gun used in the shooting was confirmed by forensic crime laboratory
technicians to be the same one stolen from a federal agent's car.
The .40-caliber handgun had been taken from a U.S. Bureau of Land
Management ranger's car that was parked in downtown San Francisco, on
June 27, 2015.[26] The ranger was in San Francisco for an official
government business trip. The ranger immediately reported the theft to
San Francisco police, as well as the Federal Bureau of Investigation's
National Crime Information Center. Police issued a citywide crime alert
but did not call in CSI technicians to examine the scene.[18]

On July 10, San Francisco County Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi said during a
press conference that federal authorities failed to provide legal basis
to hold Sanchez, and that the sheriff's department followed procedure
and local laws when they released Sanchez after a years-old warrant on a
marijuana charge was dismissed. A federal immigration request had asked
the SFSD to hold Sanchez until federal authorities could take him into
custody for deportation proceedings.[27]

Based on one ballistics expert, it has been stated that the shot was
fired accidentally and ricocheted off the pavement before traveling
another 90-95 feet and striking Steinle.[28] Sanchez admitted firing the
pistol three times.




Lawsuit[edit]

In September 2015, Steinle's parents announced their intention to file a
lawsuit against the City of San Francisco and Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE), alleging complicity and negligence in the death of
their daughter.[29]




Reaction[edit]

The killing sparked criticism and political debate over San Francisco's
sanctuary city policy, which aims to strengthen community safety by
disallowing local officials from questioning a resident's immigration
status, thus enabling local victims of crime to report without fear of
deportation. Multiple Republican presidential candidates, including
Donald Trump and Jeb Bush, made statements blaming the immigration
policy for Steinle's death, and encouraged the need for a secure border
wall.[30][31] White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest stated that the
U.S. would be safer if Republican lawmakers had approved comprehensive
immigration reform backed by President Barack Obama.[32]

2016 U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton joined California
Senator and former San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, in
condemning the policy that led to Steinle's death. Clinton said, "The
city made a mistake, not to deport someone that the federal government
strongly felt should be deported ... So I have absolutely no support for
a city that ignores the strong evidence that should be acted on."[33]
That same week, Feinstein penned a public letter to San Francisco Mayor
Ed Lee that stated, "The tragic death of Ms. Steinle could have been
avoided if the Sheriff's Department had notified ICE prior to the
release of Mr. Sanchez, which would have allowed ICE to remove him from
the country...."[34]




Local and state reaction[edit]

San Francisco County Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi received criticism by
anti-illegal immigration activist groups, including Californians for
Population Stabilization, and a range of politicians, including San
Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and California U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, for
Sanchez's release from custody before the shooting. Lee stated the
sanctuary city ordinance allows the sheriff to coordinate with federal
immigration and ICE agents. On July 7, Feinstein stated that the San
Francisco County Sheriff's Department should have notified ICE before
Sanchez was released, so that he could be deported from the county.[35]
In a press conference held on July 10, Mirkarimi blamed federal prison
and immigration officials for the series of events that led up to the
release of Sanchez.[16][36][37]




Political reactions[edit]

The Donald Trump presidential campaign for the 2016 election released
the political advertisement "Act of Love", showing Sanchez and
criticizing rival Jeb Bush's policy on immigration.[38] Later, when
accepting the Republican nomination for president at the 2016 Republican
National Convention, Trump mentioned Steinle's death as a rationale to
deport undocumented immigrants in the United States.[39]

Fox News Channel political commentator Megyn Kelly criticized President
Obama's silence on Steinle's killing, contrasting it to his direct
comments on the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Freddie
Gray.[40]

Bill O'Reilly met with Steinle's parents on July 13 on his show The
O'Reilly Factor.[41] O'Reilly and Steinle's parents discussed the idea
of a mandatory prison sentence for deported felons who return to the
U.S., an idea the parents supported. The idea is being created as an
online petition to House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell, advocating the proposal as "Kate's Law". In the days
following the interview, the Steinle family was allowed to testify
before the Senate Judiciary Committee about Kate's Law as hearings
convened before the Congress's August vacation.[42]




Kate's Law[edit]

In response to the controversy, the United States House of
Representatives authored (H.R.3011), the Establishing Mandatory Minimums
for Illegal Reentry Act of 2015 (Kate's Law).[43] However, no vote has
been held. [44] [In July 2015 however, the House did pass a related bill
that is often confused with Kate's Law, H.R.3009, the Enforce the Law
for Sanctuary Cities Act, 241-179 (same reference as above)].

In July 2016, the Senate version of the law (S. 2193), Kate's Law, was
passed 55-42, mostly by Senate republicans, but was filibustered.[45]
(The Senate also voted on another bill often confused with Kate's Law,
S.3100, the Stop Dangerous Sanctuary Cities Act. The bill passed 53-44
mostly by Senate republicans, but was filibustered.)[46]

Both the identical Senate and the House bills (H.R. 3011 and S.2193)
would have amended the Immigration and Nationality Act to increase from
two years to five years the maximum prison term for an alien who
reenters after being denied admission, excluded, deported, or removed.

It would have established:


     1. a 10-year maximum prison term for an alien who reenters after
        being denied admission, excluded, deported, or removed on 3 or
        more prior occasions; and 
     2. a 5-year mandatory minimum prison term for an alien who reenters
        after being removed following a conviction for an aggravated
        felony or following 2 or more prior convictions for illegal
        reentry.[47]


The law (S.2193) was voted down when the Senate failed to reach a
supermajority required to defeat a filibuster. The final tally was 55–42
in favor, including three "yes" Democrat votes (Donnelly, Manchin and
Heitkamp), and three abstentions (Brown-D, Graham-R, and Lee-R).[48]
Sixty votes were required to end the filibuster.




See also[edit]

      * San Francisco Bay Area portal
      * Murder of Jamiel Shaw II 
      * Edwin Ramos 
      * Office of Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement 
      * Pablo Antonio Serrano-Vitorino 
      * Ever Valles case 
      * Illegal immigration to the United States

References[edit]

     1. ^ Jump up to: a b c Littlefield, Christina (July 24, 2015).
        "Sanctuary cities: How Kathryn Steinle's death intensified the
        immigration debate". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 29,
        2015.  
     2. ^ Jump up to: a b Ranger's stolen gun used in S.F. Pier 14
        shooting, ABC 7 News, Vic Lee, July 8, 2015, "New video shows
        arrest of SF Pier 14 shooting suspect." Retrieved November 29,
        2016. 
     3. ^ Jump up to: a b c Sulek, Julie Prodis (July 9, 2015). "SF
        shooting victim Kate Steinle: 'She was about loving people,'
        friends say". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved July 9, 2015.  
     4. Jump up ^ Sernoffsky, Evan (July 6, 2015). "SF pier killing
        suspect charged with murder". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved
        January 15, 2017.  
     5. Jump up ^ Sernoffsky, Evan; Aleaziz, Hamed; Lyons, Jenna (July
        2, 2015). "Woman mourned, suspect held in random killing on S.F.
        pier". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved July 2, 2015.  
     6. Jump up ^ "Bullet That Killed Kate Steinle In SF Pier Shooting
        Appears To Have Ricocheted". CBS Bay Area. August 26, 2015.  
     7. Jump up ^ "Gun in San Francisco killing stolen from federal
        agent's vehicle, source says". CNN. Retrieved November 18,
        2015.  
     8. Jump up ^ Kate Steinle killing bullet apparently ricocheted
        before hitting Steinle expert says, Mercury News, August 28,
        2015. Retrieved November 22, 2016. 
     9. Jump up ^ Pier 14, City Maps. Retrieved November 29, 2016. 
    10. Jump up ^ Nguyen, Chris (July 9, 2015). "Funeral to be held for
        SF Pier 14 shooting victim". ABC News]]. Retrieved July 9,
        2015.  
    11. ^ Jump up to: a b Melendez, Lyanne (September 4, 2015).
        "Undocumented immigrant to face San Francisco murder trial". ABC
        News. Retrieved September 5, 2015.  
    12. ^ Jump up to: a b c d Romney, Lee; Chang, Cindy; Rubin, Joel
        (July 7, 2015). "Fatal shooting of S.F. woman reveals disconnect
        between ICE, local police; 5-time deportee charged". Los Angeles
        Times.  
    13. Jump up ^ "Undocumented Immigrant Makes Court Appearance In
        Shooting Death Of Woman On San Francisco's Waterfront". CBS Bay
        Area. August 25, 2015.  
    14. ^ Jump up to: a b Shaprio, Emily (July 10, 2015). "San Francisco
        Pier Shooting: Sheriff Defends April Release". ABC News.
        Retrieved July 10, 2015.  
    15. ^ Jump up to: a b "Reports: Federal agent's gun used in S.F.
        pier shooting". USA TODAY. July 7, 2015. Retrieved January 31,
        2017.  
    16. ^ Jump up to: a b Van Derbeken, Jaxon; Marinucci, Carla;
        Sernoffsky, Evan (July 9, 2015). "Pier-slaying defendant came to
        S.F. at sheriff's request". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved
        July 11, 2015.  
    17. Jump up ^ Sernoffsky, Evan; Van Derbeken, Jaxon (July 4, 2015).
        "Pier shooting suspect had been released from S.F. Jail". San
        Francisco Chronicle.  
    18. ^ Jump up to: a b Elias, Paul (July 8, 2015). "AP source: Fed's
        gun used in San Francisco pier slaying". Associated Press.
        Retrieved July 13, 2015.  
    19. Jump up ^ "Man charged with murder in pier shooting". ABC News.
        July 6, 2015. Retrieved July 6, 2015.  
    20. Jump up ^ Sernoffsky, Evan (July 5, 2015). "Pier killing
        suspect, in jailhouse interview, admits firing gun". San
        Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved July 5, 2015.  
    21. Jump up ^ Shapiro, Emily; Lustig, Jonah (July 8, 2015). "Federal
        Agent's Gun Used in SF Pier Slaying, Sources Say". ABC News.
        Retrieved July 13, 2015.  
    22. Jump up ^ "SF pier killing suspect faces additional gun charge".
        San Francisco Chronicle. July 28, 2015. Retrieved July 28,
        2015.  
    23. Jump up ^ Mai-Duc, Christine (September 4, 2015). "Deportee
        accused of killing Kathryn Steinle to stand trial on murder
        charge". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 5, 2015.  
    24. Jump up ^ Kate Steinle killing: Murder trial in high-profile
        killing not likely until months after election. East Bay Times
        (August 13, 2016), retrieved August 24, 2016. 
    25. Jump up ^ Kate Steinle case murder trial set for February,
        Mercury News, Thomas Peele, November 15, 2016. Retrieved
        November 22, 2016. 
    26. Jump up ^ Ho, Vivian (July 10, 2015). "Gun snatched from federal
        agent confirmed as Pier 14 weapon". San Francisco Chronicle.
        Retrieved July 10, 2015.  
    27. Jump up ^ "San Francisco sheriff defends release of immigrant
        suspect". The Press Democrat. Santa Rosa. Associated Press. July
        10, 2015. Retrieved July 10, 2015.  
    28. Jump up ^ "Kate Steinle killing: Ballistics expert calls fatal
        shot accident". San Jose Mercury News. August 27, 2015.
        Retrieved March 3, 2016.  
    29. Jump up ^ van Derbeken, Jaxon (September 1, 2015). "S.F., feds
        liable in Kathryn Steinle's death, parents say". San Francisco
        Chronicle. Retrieved September 5, 2015.  
    30. Jump up ^ Pearson, Michael (July 8, 2015). "What's a sanctuary
        city, and why should you care?". CNN. Retrieved July 8, 2015.  
    31. Jump up ^ Vinograd, Cassandra (July 4, 2015). "Donald Trump:
        Kathryn Steinle Death on Pier 14 Shows Need for Border Wall".
        NBC News. Retrieved July 5, 2015.  
    32. Jump up ^ "Press Briefing by Press Secretary Josh Earnest,
        7/6/2015". The White House. July 6, 2015. Retrieved July 6,
        2015.  
    33. Jump up ^ "Hillary Clinton's first national interview of 2016
        Race". CNN. July 7, 2015. Retrieved August 3, 2015.  
    34. Jump up ^ "Dianne Feinstein blames San Francisco sheriff's
        department in Kathryn Steinle death". July 7, 2015. Retrieved
        August 3, 2015.  
    35. Jump up ^ Richardson, Valerie (July 7, 2015). "Dianne Feinstein
        blames San Francisco sheriff's department in Kathryn Steinle
        death". The Washington Times. Retrieved July 14, 2015.  
    36. Jump up ^ "SF Mayor Lee, Sheriff Mirkarimi Play Blame Game on
        Pier 14 Shooting". CBS News. July 8, 2015. Retrieved July 8,
        2015.  
    37. Jump up ^ Reyes, Emily; Sahagun, Louis (July 4, 2015). "Fatal
        shooting in San Francisco ignites immigration debate". Los
        Angeles Times. Retrieved July 4, 2015.  
    38. Jump up ^ Weinberg, Ali (September 1, 2015). "Kate Steinle
        Lawsuit Has Political Reverberations in Washington Over Illegal
        Immigration". ABC News. Retrieved February 25, 2016.  
    39. Jump up ^ Nguyen, Chris (July 22, 2016). "Kate Steinle's family
        speaks after mention by Donald Trump at RNC". abc7news.com.
        KGO-TV. Retrieved January 15, 2017.  
    40. Jump up ^ "Megyn Kelly: 'There's No Excuse' for Obama's Silence
        on Kate Steinle's Murder". Fox News. July 10, 2015.  
    41. Jump up ^ Feldman, Josh (July 13, 2015). "Kate Steinle's Parents
        Speak Out to O'Reilly: 'I Feel Her Strength'". Mediaite.
        Retrieved May 31, 2016.  
    42. Jump up ^ Har, Jamie (July 13, 2015). "Parents' woman shot at
        pier support strict immigration law". Yahoo! News. Retrieved
        July 13, 2015.  
    43. Jump up ^ "Get the Facts on Kate's Law...". Congressman Matt
        Salmon. Retrieved August 15, 2016.  
    44. Jump up ^ EL. "Legislative Bulletin". ImmigrationForum.org.
        Retrieved September 5, 2016.  
    45. Jump up ^ EL. "Cloture on S2193". Gov Track. Retrieved September
        5, 2016.  
    46. Jump up ^ EL. "S.3100". Congress.gov. Retrieved September 5,
        2016.  
    47. Jump up ^ "S.2193 - Kate's Law". United States Congress.
        Retrieved August 15, 2016.  
    48. Jump up ^ "Senate Democrats Defeat...". Numbers USA. Retrieved
        August 15, 2016. 

Retrieved from
"https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Shooting_of_Kathryn_Steinle&oldid=768127857" 



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edwin_Ramos

Shooting of Kathryn Steinle

>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
Jump to: navigation, search 
    Shooting of Kathryn Steinle
 Pier 14, SF 4.JPG Pier 14, site of
            the shooting
              Location
Pier 14, San Francisco, California
                Date
July 1, 2015 (2015-07-01)
6:30 p.m.
               Weapon
.40-caliber SIG Sauer P226 handgun
               Victim
Kathryn Steinle
       Suspected perpetrator
Francisco Sanchez (in custody)

On July 1, 2015, a man fired a stolen gun on Pier 14 in the Embarcadero
district in San Francisco, California. The bullet ricocheted off the
pavement, then struck 32-year-old Kathryn Steinle in the back, causing
her to die two hours later at a hospital. Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez,
an illegal immigrant from Mexico who had previously been deported five
times, was arrested and charged with her murder.

The shooting sparked controversy and political debate over San
Francisco's status as a sanctuary city. President Donald Trump cited
Lopez-Sanchez in support of his proposal to deport foreign nationals
living illegally in the United States, and mentioned Steinle during his
acceptance speech at the 2016 Republican National Convention.



Contents

 [hide]  

      * 1Shooting 
      * 2Victim 
      * 3Suspect 
      * 4Legal proceedings 
              * 4.1Investigation 
              * 4.2Lawsuit 
      * 5Reaction 
              * 5.1Local and state reaction 
              * 5.2Political reactions 
              * 5.3Kate's Law 
      * 6See also 
      * 7References

Shooting[edit]

At 6:30 p.m. on July 1, 2015, Francisco Sanchez allegedly fired three
shots from a .40-caliber handgun at Pier 14, a tourist attraction area
at the Embarcadero waterfront district. One of the bullets struck
Steinle in the back and pierced her aorta. She collapsed to the pavement
while screaming for help to her father Jim, who was accompanying her at
the pier.[1] Jim performed CPR on Kathryn before paramedics arrived and
took her to an ambulance. She died two hours later at San Francisco
General Hospital.[1]

Sanchez was arrested about an hour after the shooting at Pier 40, about
one mile south of Pier 14 and divers from a police boat found the gun in
the bay alongside Pier 14, the next day.[2][3][4] Following his arrest,
Sanchez was booked into San Francisco County Jail on suspicion of
murder.[5][6]

The gun used by Sánchez had been stolen in downtown San Francisco from a
Bureau of Land Management officer's personal vehicle on June 27, 2015,
according to the Bureau of Land Management.[2] The car's window had been
broken.[7][8]




Victim[edit]

Kathryn Michelle "Kate" Steinle (December 13, 1982 – July 1, 2015) was
originally from Pleasanton, California, and graduated from Amador Valley
High School and earned a communications degree from California
Polytechnic State University.[1][3] She was employed at Medtronic in San
Francisco and was living on Beale Street, close to Pier 14, the site of
the shooting.[9][3] Her funeral was held at a winery in Pleasanton,
California on July 9.[10]




Suspect[edit]

         Francisco Sanchez
                Born
José Inez García Zarate
Mexico
            Nationality
Mexican
             Occupation
Unemployed
          Criminal charge
Second-degree murder, enhancement of
using a firearm, being a felon in
possession of a firearm[11]
          Criminal status
In jail


           Capture status
Arrested on July 1, 2015

Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez (or Francisco Sanchez; given name José Inez
García Zarate),[12] of Guanajuato, Mexico, had been deported from the
U.S. a total of five times, most recently in 2009.[13] He was on
probation in Texas at the time of the shooting.[14] He had seven felony
convictions. When he was apprehended, Sanchez was listed as 45 years old
by police, but as 52 in jail records.[15]

Sanchez arrived to the U.S. sometime before 1991, the year he was
convicted of his first drug charge in Arizona. In 1993, he was convicted
three times in Washington state for felony heroin possession and
manufacturing narcotics. Following another drug conviction and jail
term, this time in Oregon, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization
Service (INS) deported Sanchez in June 1994. However, Sanchez returned
to the U.S. within two years and was convicted again of heroin
possession in Washington state. He was deported for the second time in
1997.[12]

On February 2, 1998, Sanchez was deported for the third time, after
reentering the U.S. through Arizona. United States Border Patrol caught
him six days later at a border crossing, and a federal court sentenced
Sanchez to five years and three months in federal prison for
unauthorized reentry. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE),
formerly INS, deported Sanchez in 2003 for his fourth deportation.
However, he reentered the U.S. through the Texas border and got another
federal prison sentence for reentry before being deported for the fifth
time in June 2009.[12]

Less than three months after his fifth deportation, Sanchez was caught
attempting to cross the border in Eagle Pass, Texas. He pleaded guilty
to felony reentry; upon sentencing, a federal court recommended Sanchez
be placed in "a federal medical facility as soon as possible".[12]

On March 26, 2015, at the request of the San Francisco Sheriff's
Department, United States Bureau of Prisons (BOP) had turned Sanchez
over to San Francisco authorities for an outstanding drug warrant.[16]
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) had issued a detainer for
Sanchez requesting that he be kept in custody until immigration
authorities could pick him up. As a sanctuary city, however, which
limits cooperation with ICE only to cases where active charges against
the immigrant are identified, San Francisco did not honor the detainer
and released him, since they found no active warrant for his arrest.[17]
San Francisco officials transported Sanchez to San Francisco County Jail
on March 26, 2015, to face a 20-year-old felony charge of selling and
possessing marijuana after Sanchez completed his latest prison term in
San Bernardino County for entering in the country without the proper
documents.[18] He was released from San Francisco County Jail on April
15, and had no outstanding warrants or judicial warrants, as confirmed
by the San Francisco Sheriff's Department.[14]




Legal proceedings[edit]

Sanchez was formally charged with first-degree murder and possession of
illegal narcotics on July 6. Sanchez admitted in a KGO-TV interview that
he committed the shooting but said he found the gun wrapped in a T-shirt
under a bench after taking sleep pills he found from a trash can. He
also claimed that he was aiming at sea lions and that Steinle's shooting
was accidental.[19][15] He pleaded not guilty to the charges, and was
held on $5 million bail.[20] Sanchez's attorney, Matt Gonzalez, stated
in court that the shooting was likely accidental.[21]

On July 28, prosecutors filed an additional charge against Sanchez:
being a felon in possession of a firearm.[22] On September 4, San
Francisco Superior Court Judge Brendan Conroy stated that there was
enough evidence to try Sanchez. Initially charged with first-degree
murder, Sanchez will be tried for second-degree murder. If found guilty
of the charges of second-degree murder, being a felon in possession of a
firearm, and an enhancement of using a firearm, Sanchez could face a
life imprisonment without the possibility of parole for 45 years. A jury
can also decide if he is guilty of manslaughter.[11][23]

In August, a judge set December 2 as the date to assign the case to a
judge for trial. Lopez-Sanchez's public defender said there have been no
discussions of a plea deal.[24] The trial is scheduled for February 17,
2017.[25]




Investigation[edit]

The gun used in the shooting was confirmed by forensic crime laboratory
technicians to be the same one stolen from a federal agent's car.
The .40-caliber handgun had been taken from a U.S. Bureau of Land
Management ranger's car that was parked in downtown San Francisco, on
June 27, 2015.[26] The ranger was in San Francisco for an official
government business trip. The ranger immediately reported the theft to
San Francisco police, as well as the Federal Bureau of Investigation's
National Crime Information Center. Police issued a citywide crime alert
but did not call in CSI technicians to examine the scene.[18]

On July 10, San Francisco County Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi said during a
press conference that federal authorities failed to provide legal basis
to hold Sanchez, and that the sheriff's department followed procedure
and local laws when they released Sanchez after a years-old warrant on a
marijuana charge was dismissed. A federal immigration request had asked
the SFSD to hold Sanchez until federal authorities could take him into
custody for deportation proceedings.[27]

Based on one ballistics expert, it has been stated that the shot was
fired accidentally and ricocheted off the pavement before traveling
another 90-95 feet and striking Steinle.[28] Sanchez admitted firing the
pistol three times.




Lawsuit[edit]

In September 2015, Steinle's parents announced their intention to file a
lawsuit against the City of San Francisco and Immigration and Customs
Enforcement (ICE), alleging complicity and negligence in the death of
their daughter.[29]




Reaction[edit]

The killing sparked criticism and political debate over San Francisco's
sanctuary city policy, which aims to strengthen community safety by
disallowing local officials from questioning a resident's immigration
status, thus enabling local victims of crime to report without fear of
deportation. Multiple Republican presidential candidates, including
Donald Trump and Jeb Bush, made statements blaming the immigration
policy for Steinle's death, and encouraged the need for a secure border
wall.[30][31] White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest stated that the
U.S. would be safer if Republican lawmakers had approved comprehensive
immigration reform backed by President Barack Obama.[32]

2016 U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton joined California
Senator and former San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat, in
condemning the policy that led to Steinle's death. Clinton said, "The
city made a mistake, not to deport someone that the federal government
strongly felt should be deported ... So I have absolutely no support for
a city that ignores the strong evidence that should be acted on."[33]
That same week, Feinstein penned a public letter to San Francisco Mayor
Ed Lee that stated, "The tragic death of Ms. Steinle could have been
avoided if the Sheriff's Department had notified ICE prior to the
release of Mr. Sanchez, which would have allowed ICE to remove him from
the country...."[34]




Local and state reaction[edit]

San Francisco County Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi received criticism by
anti-illegal immigration activist groups, including Californians for
Population Stabilization, and a range of politicians, including San
Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and California U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, for
Sanchez's release from custody before the shooting. Lee stated the
sanctuary city ordinance allows the sheriff to coordinate with federal
immigration and ICE agents. On July 7, Feinstein stated that the San
Francisco County Sheriff's Department should have notified ICE before
Sanchez was released, so that he could be deported from the county.[35]
In a press conference held on July 10, Mirkarimi blamed federal prison
and immigration officials for the series of events that led up to the
release of Sanchez.[16][36][37]




Political reactions[edit]

The Donald Trump presidential campaign for the 2016 election released
the political advertisement "Act of Love", showing Sanchez and
criticizing rival Jeb Bush's policy on immigration.[38] Later, when
accepting the Republican nomination for president at the 2016 Republican
National Convention, Trump mentioned Steinle's death as a rationale to
deport undocumented immigrants in the United States.[39]

Fox News Channel political commentator Megyn Kelly criticized President
Obama's silence on Steinle's killing, contrasting it to his direct
comments on the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and Freddie
Gray.[40]

Bill O'Reilly met with Steinle's parents on July 13 on his show The
O'Reilly Factor.[41] O'Reilly and Steinle's parents discussed the idea
of a mandatory prison sentence for deported felons who return to the
U.S., an idea the parents supported. The idea is being created as an
online petition to House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell, advocating the proposal as "Kate's Law". In the days
following the interview, the Steinle family was allowed to testify
before the Senate Judiciary Committee about Kate's Law as hearings
convened before the Congress's August vacation.[42]




Kate's Law[edit]

In response to the controversy, the United States House of
Representatives authored (H.R.3011), the Establishing Mandatory Minimums
for Illegal Reentry Act of 2015 (Kate's Law).[43] However, no vote has
been held. [44] [In July 2015 however, the House did pass a related bill
that is often confused with Kate's Law, H.R.3009, the Enforce the Law
for Sanctuary Cities Act, 241-179 (same reference as above)].

In July 2016, the Senate version of the law (S. 2193), Kate's Law, was
passed 55-42, mostly by Senate republicans, but was filibustered.[45]
(The Senate also voted on another bill often confused with Kate's Law,
S.3100, the Stop Dangerous Sanctuary Cities Act. The bill passed 53-44
mostly by Senate republicans, but was filibustered.)[46]

Both the identical Senate and the House bills (H.R. 3011 and S.2193)
would have amended the Immigration and Nationality Act to increase from
two years to five years the maximum prison term for an alien who
reenters after being denied admission, excluded, deported, or removed.

It would have established:


     1. a 10-year maximum prison term for an alien who reenters after
        being denied admission, excluded, deported, or removed on 3 or
        more prior occasions; and 
     2. a 5-year mandatory minimum prison term for an alien who reenters
        after being removed following a conviction for an aggravated
        felony or following 2 or more prior convictions for illegal
        reentry.[47]


The law (S.2193) was voted down when the Senate failed to reach a
supermajority required to defeat a filibuster. The final tally was 55–42
in favor, including three "yes" Democrat votes (Donnelly, Manchin and
Heitkamp), and three abstentions (Brown-D, Graham-R, and Lee-R).[48]
Sixty votes were required to end the filibuster.




See also[edit]

      * San Francisco Bay Area portal
      * Murder of Jamiel Shaw II 
      * Edwin Ramos 
      * Office of Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement 
      * Pablo Antonio Serrano-Vitorino 
      * Ever Valles case 
      * Illegal immigration to the United States

References[edit]

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